Communicating development 2.0: No more public relations propaganda?

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Filed under: Development 2.0

As an international development communicator with a background in journalism, I have written my share of glossy development ‘success stories’.

They typically begin with a glowing story of how one person’s life has improved thanks to a development project, and then we go on to say that this same project has helped X thousands of people.

While I think it is important to show donors that the development dollars they give us are leading to concrete results, I also wondered whether such PR is really helping us — or whether it is undermining our ability to convey the results of our work in a convincing and credible way.

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Getting a handle on it: Twitter and disaster relief in fYR Macedonia

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Filed under: Development 2.0 Disaster response Social innovation

old painting

#DRR back in the day: Recovery efforts in Scotland during the Tay Bridge disaster in 1879

As the recent devastation wrought by flooding in Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina has shown, social media has a vital role to play in spreading information during natural and human-made disasters.

Twitter is a great example of a platform that can quickly deliver vital information to a vast number of people.

So Igor Miskovski of the E-Technologies and Networks Center in Skopje and I decided to run a little experiment.

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Why troublemakers should work together: Ten thoughts on innovation and gender equality

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Filed under: Development 2.0 Gender equality Guest posts Social innovation

Pushing innovation and working for gender equality are a natural fit.

Both necessitate the combination of causing trouble, looking at internal mechanisms, and working with non-traditional partners.

Moreover, both have transformational potential.

Inspired by UNDP’s current innovation agenda and Giulio Quaggiotto’s Development 2.0 Manifesto, we formulated some principles on innovation and gender equality.

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Outdoor development in Turkey: It’s possible!

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Filed under: Development Environment

billboard on street

Check out our latest story on how we’re getting 5,000 men and women in Southeastern Anatolia back to work.

Recently the skyline in two of Turkey’s biggest cities underwent a bit of a makeover.

That’s because UNDP in Turkey launched outdoor visibility campaigns in İstanbul and Ankara to help get the word out on what sustainable development for everyone is all about.

The campaign focused on the concept on sustainable energy with the hashtag: #bencemümkün (“it’s possible”)

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The end is just the beginning: Saying YES in Montenegro

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Filed under: Development 2.0 Social inclusion Social innovation

montengro bog pic 3

Because the selection cycle is over, it feels like the YES initiative is coming to an end. In reality, this is just the beginning

In our previous blog about the Youth Employment Solutions (YES) initiative, we talked about our competition to find new solutions to youth unemployment.

After extensive discussions, the young participants came up with 14 bold ideas to implement in their local communities.

Four finalists were selected by an expert jury and the online community to receive micro-grants.

Because the selection cycle is over, it feels like the YES initiative is coming to an end. But in reality, this is just the beginning: These same young people who discussed, designed, and developed solutions will now go out put them into action.

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Foresight at the forefront: Examples in action

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Filed under: Development 2.0 Social inclusion Social innovation

boy jumping

What is the future of citizen engagement in government? Take our survey and tell us what you think (Photo: Garrett Gill)

So now that you’ve read my best-of-foresight reading list, aren’t you curious to see how all of this is actually being applied to the development context?

Well then, look no further!

As we get ever closer to #UNDP4Future on 16-17 June in Istanbul, I’ve made a list projects putting foresight at the forefront:

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Georgia on my mind: New approaches to governance

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Filed under: Development 2.0 Governance Social inclusion

winners circle

Our recent Diplohack innovation challenge engaged citizens of all ages to find creative ways of interacting with the government

All around the world, we are seeing fundamental changes in the meaning of governance and ‘networked democracy‘ – particularly in the shifting role of citizens, from passive consumers of government services to active participants.

This is also having a major impact on the way public services are designed and delivered.

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Game changer: Five things we learned playing Youth@Work in Moldova

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Filed under: Development 2.0 Social inclusion Social innovation

Winners of the Youth at Work game in Moldova (photo credit UNDP in Moldova)

The winner’s circle: Read more about why we decided to use gaming for employment in Moldova

The three exciting weeks of playing Youth@Work on Community PlanIt are over. The awards have found their winners and we are in the process of analyzing the results.

We at UNDP, the Engagement Lab at Emerson College, and National Council of Youth from Moldova, have been hard at work for the past five months, designing and implementing this exciting project.

While a more comprehensive analysis is forthcoming, we are eager to share five things we learned from the project thus far.

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#UNDP4Future: The essential foresight reading list

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Filed under: Development 2.0 Governance Social innovation

digital library 4 blog

Noah Raford: “Classical strategic planning is based upon the assumption of a slowly changing future. That assumption is wrong.”

In preparing for the upcoming research and development event, Foresight for Development – Shaping the New Future, one of my tasks was to compile an essential reading list for the participants.

This is easier said than done. There are gigabytes and terabytes of publications, books, and blogs out there. How was I to synthesize all of this into just two pages?

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